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As the leader in the Green Industry, we provide exceptional landscape services to quality-focused commercial property owners and managers in the Northern Colorado community. We work together as a friendly team who values integrity and provides open, honest communication in every aspect of our work. Everything we do is done to benefit our customers, employees, vendors and the community.

Monday, May 17, 2010

Tired of rain, snow, gray days?


Then plant some flowers!
Columbine, coral bells and pin cushion
are showy, early season perennials.



It's a stubborn year when winter won't give way to spring. Still, there are many flowers to be planted and enjoyed in spite of the frost.
Some are perennials--the hardiest of plants that come back year after year. And there are also many cold-hardy annuals.


Now is prime time to go to the nursery or garden center and see all the spring-blooming perennials. Look them over and decide which plants you'd like to see flowering in your yard this time next year. Then take them home and get the in the ground. By planting them right away, they'll have a very long growing season to get established--and that will enhance their good looks next year.




Dianthus--frost hardy annual.
 


With our delayed start to spring and lingering cold temps, this would be a good year to choose annual flowers from the cold-hardy varieties. Especially at higher elevation, there will be more threat of frost in your future. The good news is that you can still have annual flowers. Just chose carefully.


Frost Hardy Annuals - withstand temps to 20 degrees or less. Alyssum - Anemone - Cherianthus - Dianthus - Dusty Miller - Flowering Kale & Flowering Cabbage - Pansies - Perennials - Ranunculus - Snapdragons - Statice - Verbena rigida - Viola.
Frost Tolerant Annuals - withstand temps down to 20 degrees. Calendula - Nicotiana - Petunias - Phlox (Annual) - Salvia Victoria - Salvia greggii - Stocks - Verbena canadensis.


Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC
Half-Hardy Annuals - tolerate very cold temps, but no direct frost. Ageratum - Asters - Gazania - Geraniums - Lobelia - Verbena (Upright). These plants need to be covered to be protected from frost. Use cloth rather than plastic as plastic will attract the frost to any part of the plant it touches.

Friday, May 7, 2010

Say Happy Mothers Day with a container full of plants!

Instead of the traditional bouquet of flowers, treat mom to some plants that will bloom for months come. Design mom's container yourself and play to her favorite colors and flowers. You can even combine beauty with function by mixing herbs and veggies alongside flowers or putting them in separate containers.

Here are some tips to get started.

Thriller, filler, spiller, is the design formula
When you go to the garden center, remember thriller, spiller, and filler as you pick out your plants. Thriller is the tall and often dramatic plant that is usually placed in the center of the container. Filler includes all the rounded or mounded plants that will fill out the container. And spiller is the trailing plants that will spill over the side and visually break the sharpness of the container's edge. Spillers can be either flowering or foliage plants. With plants in all three categories, you'll be headed in the right design direction.
Next, think color
Incorporate mom's favorite color by combining plants with different shades of one color. For example, hot pink and rose petunias can be planted with light pink Calibrachoa and pink verbena with white centers. Another interesting combo is made up of all foliage or foliage with a pop of just one color. Think about what mom likes and make it happen.

Veggies in pots are great for moms who are limited to growing plants on balconies or patios--or just want to pick their tomatoes close to the kitchen. For container gardening, look for veggies that are compact, produce smaller-sized fruits and grow more like a bush, rather than a trailing vine. Also look for varieties that mature rather quickly.
A great small-fruited variety, that has a shorter maturing time, is Tomato Tumblin' Tom. It grows handfuls of round, cherry-like fruit and has a weeping habit that will spill over the side of containers. This attractive tomato will grow in hanging baskets, window boxes and tall containers.
Several herbs can be grouped together or used as the foliage component among flowers. Their variety of sizes, shapes and colors offer some great combos. Select mom's faves and you will create a long-loved gift.

Reminder: The last average date of frost is May 17th so there's still the threat of frost. And since plants right out of the greenhouse aren't ready for cold nights, they will need to be covered if temps will hit near 32 degrees. Use cloth rather than plastic to protect your plants.





Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC