Our Mission

As the leader in the Green Industry, we provide exceptional landscape services to quality-focused commercial property owners and managers in the Northern Colorado community. We work together as a friendly team who values integrity and provides open, honest communication in every aspect of our work. Everything we do is done to benefit our customers, employees, vendors and the community.

Monday, March 21, 2011

CUT YOUR WEEDING IN HALF

Bed weeding is a pain for all of us, being on your hands and knees pulling or dragging out the sprayer and lugging it around the yard. It is a job that still needs done but add pre-emergent to your spray mixture and your weeding chore will be considerably shorter. Pre-emergent only attacks seeds that are ready to germinate, so it is good practice to use it every time spraying is needed. It is safe to spray on existing plant material only once you have thoroughly cleaned the sprayer or it can be applied in granular form before a rain or watering event. Typically spreading granular pre-emergent in your beds in the spring will give a good head start. Apply it in April and have weed free beds in May.

Pre-emergent is a little expensive but a little goes a long way so remember to read those labels and apply at the appropriate amounts. Also remember if you are mixing pre-emergent to your round up only spray what you want to kill or areas you want nothing to grow.

Tip provided by FLM's Scott Gablehouse

Monday, March 14, 2011

Ready to plant something?

Carrots can be planted now.
Countdown to growing season!


This weekend the weather was warm. Daylight savings time began. And it's just 7 days until spring. Must be about time to plant something--and it is!
Right about mid-March is when we can plant those cool season veggies. Here are some choices you can start planting now:
  • Early lettuce, like bibb
  • Radishes
  • Spinach
  • Carrots
  • Sugar snap peas or other peas that mature early.
Once these veggies are harvested in about mid-May, the garden can be re-planted with warm season crops--like broccoli, cauliflower, small cabbage and peas. When that crop is harvested around mid-July, that garden plot can again be planted with a repeat of the cool-season varieties. At that time, you can also add green onions and early-maturing snap beans. These plants should mature and be ready to harvest before the early fall frost.

When planting three successive crops, the key to pulling it all off in about six months is in counting the days to maturity--in other words, the time it takes for the seed to mature and yield vegetables ripe enough to pick.

Iceberg lettuce is generally 60 days from planting to harvest. Bibb lettuce matures in about 46 days--but the crop can be thinned out as early as 28 days. In Colorado's growing season, selecting varieties that mature more quickly, like bibb over iceberg, is what makes those three successive crops possible.

How do you know days to maturity? Check the back of the seed packet. The label will have valuable planting information and that includes days to maturity for the seeds inside.

And don't forget to plant some color! We're still about two months out for planting petunias and all the other annuals. But pansies can be planted as long as they have been hardened off to be accustomed to being outdoors. If you cover them with fabric when temps get below freezing, pansies can be planted either in pots or in the ground.

Pansies are Mother Nature's gift of early spring here in Colorado. They are the early flowers of the season that help us survive until we can go wild planting all those wonderful annuals!




Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Ambiance after Dark

The love of being outdoors lures us to drift from afternoon to evening to night-time enjoyment of our patios and backyards. That's partly because outdoor living resonates with our primal needs to connect with nature that get thwarted as we fight for space on the freeway and work in hermitically sealed offices.


At the end of the day, that lounge chair on the patio by the pot of petunias is ever so inviting. And when we can stretch late-day relaxation into the night-time hours, it's all the better.

But if your patio or deck is well lit and the rest of your yard is pitch dark, you know that uncomfortable feeling of sitting in light while being surrounded by darkness. The cozy ambiance of soft lighting and candles where you relax is simply undone by the darkness that stretches beyond. That can feel a little creepy.

The solution, of course, is to add more light--but not too much and not too bright. Adding light to outdoor living areas has to be done strategically and with subtlety.

Lighting up interesting areas of the yard makes the whole landscape more enjoyable after dark--and it cures that uneasy feeling of being surrounded by total darkness. Adding better light to the area by the grill means more food prep can be done outdoors and that's also a convenience factor with fewer steps back and forth to the kitchen.

Outdoor lighting is one of the more recent bells and whistles for landscaped areas--but it's also one of the most affordable options. It can be installed cost-effectively in a new yard and it can also be retrofitted later for not much more expense.

If you're thinking about lighting up the night around your home this season, think about security and safety as well as atmosphere. Notice whether people can see your address clearly at night, whether the sidewalk--and especially steps--are well lit. Outdoor lighting increases home security and it's one of the top items on the list for curb appeal to consider if your home is about to go on the market.




Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC