Our Mission

As the leader in the Green Industry, we provide exceptional landscape services to quality-focused commercial property owners and managers in the Northern Colorado community. We work together as a friendly team who values integrity and provides open, honest communication in every aspect of our work. Everything we do is done to benefit our customers, employees, vendors and the community.

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Help Plants Beat the Heat with Mulch


Hot weather can be as hard on plants as it is on people.

Staying hydrated is as critical to our plants as it is to us. Of course, we don't want to use any more water than is necessary in the process. That's why adding mulch to beds is one of the best ways to help plants stay perky in the heat.

Adding mulch is a sustainable step that is scientifically proven to save water. In everyday terms, a layer of mulch helps plants retain moisture in the root zone and it slows evaporation.

And there are other benefits. Mulch helps to control weeds. When you buy locally produced mulch products, you're upping the sustainability factor even more.

What are the options?
To select the best mulch for your property, consider a variety of factors. Do you have dogs? Do you live in a windy area? Do you want the lowest maintenance option for the long term--or the most "green" option available? Property conditions and personal preferences will determine the best mulch for your situation.

Here are a variety of mulch options and some of the pros and cons of each:

• Grass clippings are one of the most sustainable mulches available because you recycle them right back into the property where they grew. With a mulching lawn mower, clippings stay on the lawn and that really helps hold in moisture. When clippings decompose, they also add nutrients that are good for the grass. If you don't have a mulching mower, rake or bag the clippings and put them around veggies. You'll be amazed how grass mulch helps hold in moisture--and also how it controls weeds!

• Rock is the most durable mulch and it won't blow away. It's excellent for rock gardens. On the down side, it heats up and consequently, is not as effective as other options to moderate conditions around plants. If you have a dog that likes to chew rocks, the small river rock variety is not a good choice. Use larger cobble that's about the size of a baked potato.

• Bark chip mulch is cooler than rock but does have to be replaced every year or two depending on the size of the chips. This mulch may not the most "green" choice unless you get a locally recycled product. It can blow away in high wind areas.

• Gorilla hair is a woven, textured product that is great for high wind areas and it will also decompose over time. The down side is that it's difficult to clean and may need to be flipped over to keep a neat appearance.

• Aspen fines not only offer a well-dressed look around plants, but they are a local, recycled product. Because they break down quickly, they need to be replaced often.

• Dyed mulch can be among the least desirable of all the mulches because of its bright color and the dyes that make it less "green" than other choices. If you like the color, ask how the mulch has been dyed. Mulches dyed with clay-based paints won't be harmful to the environment. Colors can fade in Colorado's intense sun.

• Soil Pep is dark, black garden mulch that offers an attractive and elegant look around annuals and perennials. Because it is comprised of organic material, it is similar to compost but not as fine textured. It is top choice of many gardeners because, like compost, it helps improve soil quality. This product is not as long-lasting as other mulches; it needs to be replaced at least once a year to maintain its characteristic elegant look.


Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Friday, July 8, 2011

Were your sprinklers running in the rain?


Sprinklers in the rain = money down the drain
Yesterday's downpour along the Front Range is a good reminder to all of us with sprinkler systems that we need that "gizmo" to keep them from watering during or right after a deluge.

This gizmo could be a variety of quick add-ons to your sprinkler system. These devices either shut off the system right after a big rain or constantly monitor weather and/or moisture data to tell the sprinkler system to run only when it needs to.

Whichever gizmo you choose, you won't get caught with sprinklers throwing water on top of already soaked grass. And the money you save in water costs will also help cover the cost of the device. Plus, there may even be rebates from your water district to recoup more of your costs.

Sprinkler gizmos that save water
Moisture sensor/rain shut-off devices
There are many products from very simple to more high-tech varieties--but they are all designed to keep the sprinklers from running when there is adequate moisture in the ground. These devices pay for themselves in a short time. Even the most basic, but still effective device, can be purchased and installed for less than $100.

Timers that take charge
The timer or controller that is programmed to tell your sprinkler system when to operate is the most critical water management device on your sprinkler system.

The most basic sprinkler timers rely on the property owner to tell them when to run and when not to run. If we are off in our timing--or don't make seasonal adjustments throughout the growing season--it will just keep doing what we told it to do and the lawn may suffer the consequences. The lawn's water needs when we set the timer in May are much different than they are in the heat of July.

To manage your lawn and your water effectively, think about replacing a traditional timer with a more sophisticated and high-tech one. These devices can really manage your system for you--and they are affordable.

Watering timers like Smart Controllers and ET Controllers take over whether you are at home or away. Depending on the model, they can monitor local weather data, use historical weather data and/or relate to real-time conditions in your own yard to determine whether your sprinkler should run--or not.

There are many good models available and one of them could be just what you need in your yard. Collectively, they offer us a very sustainable option that helps conserve water for the good of the community while helping to cut our individual water use and costs.


Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Friday, May 6, 2011

Give mom black petunias for Mother's Day?

This year, give mom a new twist on Garden Favorites!
You can never go wrong with traditional containers with pink and white or red and white flowers to delight mom on Mother's Day. But this year, you could step beyond the conventional container.






Finally . . . basic black is in with flowers!

It's taken awhile for growers to develop the black petunia, but this year you can find them at retailers. If mom has a flair for drama, she might appreciate the Black-tie Combo available at many garden centers. You can create your own combo, too, using just black and white petunias. Or add some red or yellow petunias for a bright spot of color.

Did you know you can now grow impatiens in the sun?
Also new in 2011 is the sun-patiens. Unlike the impatiens plants we've enjoyed for years on shaded porches and patios, this one grows in the sun! If mom has a south or west-facing porch or patio, now she can enjoy a container of impatiens that won't die of sunstroke.

What's else is new in outdoor color? Everything!
Trendy d├ęcor finally moved beyond forest green, so there are now many colors in outdoor furnishings. Think about matching a patio planter to mom's color scheme.

Take a lesson from the monochromatic, pre-made hanging baskets, like Purple Cleopatra now at garden centers, that give bold one-color accents. This one features purple vein petunias combined with verbena and calibrachoa in other shades of purple. Your mom's fave may not be purple, but you get the idea. Working around one color is easy to do.

Adding accents of white flowers, like white geraniums and petunias, as well as green foliage will bring different interest to a one-color pot or basket.

Think practical, too
  • If mom loves to cook, give her a container or two with herbs and veggies.
  • If she's a tea drinker, plant some tasty mint in a teapot for a fun gift that also lets her pick and brew her own fresh tea. Besides traditional flavors of spearmint or peppermint, other flavor sensations can be found in orange mint and even chocolate mint. Not only is mint good tea, it's also a great garnish for fruit.
  • Balance out showy containers with some down-to-earth useful items. Tuck a new trowel, package of fertilizer, gardening gloves or some seed packets among the plants.
  • Or get even more practical with the gift of help for her yard. Provide a service for pruning her plants, creating a raised veggie garden or mowing the lawn all season.
In the realm of growing and giving, there are many lovely and useful options.

Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Got The Scoop On Your Dirt?

Good soil and good seeds make a garden grow

 Experienced gardeners know that the quality of veggies you get out of the ground is directly related to what you put in it.
Use seed tape for uniform spacing.

Everything that happens down in that dirt is what makes plants grow--or not! So starting from the ground up, get the real scoop on your soil--and then the seeds.

Check your dirt
If you don't know the kind of soil you have, your growing efforts may not bring the best results. Having low organic matter in the range of less than 1 per cent is typical in Colorado. So to get soil to the desired range of 3 to 5 per cent organic matter, you will most likely need to amend the soil.

Before adding amendments, however, get a soil test to learn what you really need to add. A soil test (available from Colorado State University for much less than $50) gives important information about the PH of the soil, salt content, amount of organic matter and the content of several minerals like nitrogen.

The CSU soil test kit tells how to submit your soil sample. Results arrive in a few weeks and you don't have to be a scientist to understand them. When you know what your soil needs, you can go about adding it.

Sort out the seeds
Planting old seeds that don't germinate can cost you two to three weeks of outdoor growing time before you know the seeds have failed and you need to replant. That's time you don't want to lose in Colorado's growing season. Check expiration dates on seed bags from past seasons and toss expired seeds.

Can you use seeds harvested from last year's garden? The next generation of seeds from hybridized plants is generally less reliable than the fresh seeds you can buy. Also, as plants cross-pollinate with other garden plants, the mixed-up results land in the seeds--and the next season's plants. Consequently, this year's veggies may look a lot different than last year's.

Seed planting tips
Plant seeds in garden rows that run east to west. The east/west orientation gives the sunniest advantage for your crop and more even plant growth.


Use seed tape to speed up planting and get uniform spacing. You can find these seeds in bags similar to loose seeds at garden centers. Seeds come pre-attached to a paper tape so all you have to do is run the tape down the row and cover it with soil. Within a few days, the tape disintegrates and the seeds germinate.


Plant seeds for your early season crop of cool season veggies--like spinach, lettuce, carrots--before the end of April.

Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Heading out this weekend?

Weather this week reminds us that we're at the jumping off point for another glorious season outdoors. We're deciding what to plant-more veggies, splashier annuals, more perennials for longer lived color.


Before we get busy and just go plant something, we need to pull back. Think big picture.

What do you want your landscape, your balcony, your front porch, your patio, your curb appeal to do for YOU? Where does your landscape meet your life and how can you make it better?

If your outdoor space is where you want to live (or want to live more) in the warm months, do everything you can to make it friendly for you, your family, your guests.

  • Do you need an expanded lawn area for little soccer players to kick the ball around?
  • Has the dog worn trails across the grass that need to be remedied?
  • Would an outdoor food prep area make entertaining easier?
  • If you added some color and greenery to your patio, would that draw you outdoors more?
  • Could a real fire pit create a gathering place for the teenagers you'd like to keep closer to home?
Answering these questions is all about having a plan and in the landscaping world, we call that plan a landscape design. The design relates to how we want to live in our landscape in a very pragmatic way. It incorporates the details that make the pet happy, cater to the kids, create privacy and drive the outdoor ambiance we want to enjoy.

On the practical side, a new design can be a problem-solver. Creating the big picture perspective for your space (even a very small one) will also point out problem areas that could be solved. Screening off the AC unit or solving a drainage problem by the downspouts isn't as much fun as adding a fire pit. But solving those problems along the way will help your state of mind and safeguard your property.

This weekend, if you're out planting carrot seeds or pushing petunias into pots, get a fresh take on how you want your landscape to meet up with your life.




Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Monday, March 21, 2011

CUT YOUR WEEDING IN HALF

Bed weeding is a pain for all of us, being on your hands and knees pulling or dragging out the sprayer and lugging it around the yard. It is a job that still needs done but add pre-emergent to your spray mixture and your weeding chore will be considerably shorter. Pre-emergent only attacks seeds that are ready to germinate, so it is good practice to use it every time spraying is needed. It is safe to spray on existing plant material only once you have thoroughly cleaned the sprayer or it can be applied in granular form before a rain or watering event. Typically spreading granular pre-emergent in your beds in the spring will give a good head start. Apply it in April and have weed free beds in May.

Pre-emergent is a little expensive but a little goes a long way so remember to read those labels and apply at the appropriate amounts. Also remember if you are mixing pre-emergent to your round up only spray what you want to kill or areas you want nothing to grow.

Tip provided by FLM's Scott Gablehouse

Monday, March 14, 2011

Ready to plant something?

Carrots can be planted now.
Countdown to growing season!


This weekend the weather was warm. Daylight savings time began. And it's just 7 days until spring. Must be about time to plant something--and it is!
Right about mid-March is when we can plant those cool season veggies. Here are some choices you can start planting now:
  • Early lettuce, like bibb
  • Radishes
  • Spinach
  • Carrots
  • Sugar snap peas or other peas that mature early.
Once these veggies are harvested in about mid-May, the garden can be re-planted with warm season crops--like broccoli, cauliflower, small cabbage and peas. When that crop is harvested around mid-July, that garden plot can again be planted with a repeat of the cool-season varieties. At that time, you can also add green onions and early-maturing snap beans. These plants should mature and be ready to harvest before the early fall frost.

When planting three successive crops, the key to pulling it all off in about six months is in counting the days to maturity--in other words, the time it takes for the seed to mature and yield vegetables ripe enough to pick.

Iceberg lettuce is generally 60 days from planting to harvest. Bibb lettuce matures in about 46 days--but the crop can be thinned out as early as 28 days. In Colorado's growing season, selecting varieties that mature more quickly, like bibb over iceberg, is what makes those three successive crops possible.

How do you know days to maturity? Check the back of the seed packet. The label will have valuable planting information and that includes days to maturity for the seeds inside.

And don't forget to plant some color! We're still about two months out for planting petunias and all the other annuals. But pansies can be planted as long as they have been hardened off to be accustomed to being outdoors. If you cover them with fabric when temps get below freezing, pansies can be planted either in pots or in the ground.

Pansies are Mother Nature's gift of early spring here in Colorado. They are the early flowers of the season that help us survive until we can go wild planting all those wonderful annuals!




Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Ambiance after Dark

The love of being outdoors lures us to drift from afternoon to evening to night-time enjoyment of our patios and backyards. That's partly because outdoor living resonates with our primal needs to connect with nature that get thwarted as we fight for space on the freeway and work in hermitically sealed offices.


At the end of the day, that lounge chair on the patio by the pot of petunias is ever so inviting. And when we can stretch late-day relaxation into the night-time hours, it's all the better.

But if your patio or deck is well lit and the rest of your yard is pitch dark, you know that uncomfortable feeling of sitting in light while being surrounded by darkness. The cozy ambiance of soft lighting and candles where you relax is simply undone by the darkness that stretches beyond. That can feel a little creepy.

The solution, of course, is to add more light--but not too much and not too bright. Adding light to outdoor living areas has to be done strategically and with subtlety.

Lighting up interesting areas of the yard makes the whole landscape more enjoyable after dark--and it cures that uneasy feeling of being surrounded by total darkness. Adding better light to the area by the grill means more food prep can be done outdoors and that's also a convenience factor with fewer steps back and forth to the kitchen.

Outdoor lighting is one of the more recent bells and whistles for landscaped areas--but it's also one of the most affordable options. It can be installed cost-effectively in a new yard and it can also be retrofitted later for not much more expense.

If you're thinking about lighting up the night around your home this season, think about security and safety as well as atmosphere. Notice whether people can see your address clearly at night, whether the sidewalk--and especially steps--are well lit. Outdoor lighting increases home security and it's one of the top items on the list for curb appeal to consider if your home is about to go on the market.




Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Friday, February 18, 2011

Need fresh ideas for your landscape?

Find inspiration for your landscape


Whether it's more Zen or more zing your landscape needs, you can find fresh ideas from ALCC's Excellence in Landscape Awards. This year's awards competition showcases the best designs, installations and maintenance projects throughout Colorado--and the photo gallery of recent recipients can inspire you for the outdoor season that's just weeks ahead.

Here are five fresh ideas from these award-winning landscapes that you might want to consider:


• Small spaces can be amazing places for outdoor living. A high-rise balcony or townhome backyard offer great possibilities. Or for an expansive yard, tucking a small living area into an inconspicuous space can make a cozy retreat.

• Outdoor lighting adds security, curb appeal and evening drama around a home.

• There's nothing like annual flowers for outdoor pizzazz. From new spins on traditional designs to exotic flower combos, annuals remain the number one outdoor fashion statement.

• Edibles are in and should not be segregated from the rest of the yard. Carefully placed combos of flowers and veggies not only ward off pests, but bring new visual interest to planting beds.

• Perennials are the newest trend for landscape value. Because they keep coming back year after year, perennial plants are the sought-after landscape investment for the long term. Seasoned gardeners know this--and others are catching on fast to this great outdoor value.


Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Monday, January 31, 2011

Why buy new seeds?

Seeds and more
SEEDS--the miracle of Mother Nature
 
It's mystery and nature's own magic how those small specs and dots fall into the earth and before you know it, spinach, lettuce, herbs, carrots, zucchini, pumpkins and radishes are all over the place.
Spring planting is just around the corner, so now is the time to sort out the old seeds and order new ones.

Can I use last season's left-over seeds?
While some plant varieties will produce seeds that will last for centuries, they are generally the exception. Anasazi beans collected from the cliff dwellings in southwestern Colorado that were planted soon after discovery were good to grow.
Beans, grain and corn are generally longer-lived than other plants--but their hybridized versions we use predominately today don't have a prolonged shelf-life. Best rule of thumb is to check the expiration date on old seed bags and toss expired seeds.

If you have left-over seeds from past seasons that are questionable, you can check them out with a pre-season germination test. Plant a couple seeds of each variety indoors now in a sand/peat mix. If they don't germinate, don't waste your time with them later outdoors.
Planting old seeds that don't germinate can cost you two to three weeks of outdoor growing time before you know the seeds failed and you need to replant. That's time you don't want to lose in Colorado's growing season.

Can I use seeds harvested from last year's garden?

The next generation of seeds from hybridized plants is generally less reliable than the fresh seeds you can buy. Also, as plants cross-pollinate with other garden plants, the mixed-up results land in the seeds.
For example, if you plant seeds from last year's huge pumpkin that grew next to the zucchini, the fruit that grows this year from those seeds may be a surprise. It may not look anything like last year's prize pumpkin. That's part of the magic that matters when you select seeds.

What about heirlooms?

Heirloom varieties are the old-favorite plants that go back many years, some to Colonial days. Heirlooms have been collected and maintained for generations and have not been hybridized. These seeds can be collected for future seasons and will remain true to the original plant as long as they have not cross-pollinated with another variety in the garden. To keep heirlooms going from plant to seed to plant, season after season, keep them isolated from non-heirlooms.

How much and when to order?

For most home gardeners, one or two seed packets per variety are all you'll need. To have the best selection in seeds, place your order soon. Popular varieties will sell out, so be an early bird if you want to catch the best seed.




Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Friday, January 21, 2011

Not the sharpest shovel in the shed?

Get ready to dig!


The snow's melted. The sun came out. Temperatures are rising and we die-hard gardeners have got a hankering to get outside and do something!

Like race-car drivers trembling at the starting line, we're waiting to hear our own version of "Drivers: start your engines!"

Downshift. The best we can say right now is, "Gardeners: sharpen your shovels!"

If your favorite shovel in the shed isn't sharp, now really would be a fine time to get after it. Planting time will be here in a couple months and you will feel good knowing your tools are ready to go.

These are the supplies you will need:
  • Rags
  • Steel wool
  • Mineral spirits
  • Metal file
Remove all rust before sharpening the blade of a shovel or hoe. Because rust shortens the life of garden tools, it's always best to keep implements rust free. Wipe off the worst grime with a rag and use steel wool to scrub off the rust. Then wipe down both the metal tool and wooden handle with mineral oil.Sharpen the blade using the metal file. For really dull blades, you may need to take them to a lawnmower repair shop or a store that rents small equipment where they can use a grinding wheel to restore the sharp edge. During the gardening season, use the file on a regular basis to maintain sharpness. All tools perform best when they are sharp.

While you're at it, check out the handles. Using tools with damaged handles is a safety hazard. If the tool head is in good condition, you can replace just the handle. Fiberglass handles are a nice option for replacements because they are more durable than wood and won't put splinters in your hands. If you don't have the time or inclination to replace handles yourself, check with a local rental store as often, they are set up to provide this service.

Revving up: This month, tools are clean. Next month, garden shows open statewide. Month after that, grab sharp shovel and staaaaaart digging!







Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Friday, January 7, 2011

Tuck plants in for a cold winter nap



When the temperature bottoms out, many plants fall into such cold, hard times they don't bounce back. Before the temps hit sub-zero this weekend, however, there's still time to give these plants the TLC they need to survive the bitter cold.

Start by grabbing hold of Saturday to water the lawn one more time. Give plenty of water to slopes and south and west facing areas because these will be the driest areas. This moisture is not only good for the sod, but will also deal with mites that thrive in dry turf. Moisture is one of the best and easiest remedies for these pests. After watering, remember to un-hook the hose.

Next job: seek out your most tender plants to give them extra protection against the cold. Bear in mind that many of our low-water plants that thrive in the dry summer may not be cold hardy in near-zero temps.

To protect these plants, mulch the bases either with straw or shredded wood mulch. Straw and shredded mulch are loose and fluffy and less apt to create the wet and soggy conditions we need to avoid.

Common landscape plants to protect include:

• Grapes which need protection from the root crown and to about 18 inches up the canes. Because the mulch will be stacked high, wrap the pile with burlap to hold it in place.
• Other perennials such as: pansies, roses--including Meidiland and miniature roses, mums of the less cold-hardy varieties, hibiscus and some penstemon.
• Non-native or less hardy ornamental grasses such as Mexican feather grass, northern sea oats, Japanese forest grass, blood grass and pampas grass also need mulching, but the grasses will need to be cut down to about 6 to 12 inches before applying the mulch. Cover the mulch with burlap to keep it in place.

More about grasses. The more cold hardy grasses common in our landscapes include Karl Foerster and native grasses such as blue avena, blue fescue, little blue stem and switch grass. They are generally left uncut during the dormant season to provide winter interest. However, if grasses get broken down by heavy snow, you may need to be cut them back before spring.

Enjoy your Saturday outdoors before the deep freeze hits. As the thermometer drops, take heart in knowing that temps around zero eliminate certain landscape pests we're better off without. There's a warm silver lining in that cold, gray cloud!

Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC
Photo courtesy David Winger Landscape Photography.