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As the leader in the Green Industry, we provide exceptional landscape services to quality-focused commercial property owners and managers in the Northern Colorado community. We work together as a friendly team who values integrity and provides open, honest communication in every aspect of our work. Everything we do is done to benefit our customers, employees, vendors and the community.

Thursday, July 22, 2010

Now that most plants are really taking off in the garden, it's time to give some support to maturing plants and check for health problems.

Companion Plants like these ward off insects


Upgrade tomato cages
When tomatoes outgrow their first tomato cage, stack another one on top of the first one. Then tie tall branches to the new cage to keep the plant growing upward. While you're at it, thin tomatoes by pruning away smaller branches close to the inside of plant. Also prune any branches that are touching the ground.

Create a tepee for climbing beans
Pine, cedar and bamboo are excellent materials to create a support that is both sturdy and fun. Let the kids paint or decorate the tepee poles for extra interest.

Check plants for insects and disease
Here are some common problems with their tell-tale symptoms:
Flea beetle infestations show up with lacy, torn leaves. Remove and dispose of the infested leaves.
Early Blight, Leaf Spot and Rust have characteristic brown or black spots on the leaves, which will then turn yellow. Remove damaged leaves still on plants and any leaves on the ground.
Blossom End Rot is recognizable by black spots or lesions on the bottom of tomatoes. Remove and dispose of the infected tomatoes. Typically, end rot only shows up on the first crop of tomatoes and not on the ones that follow.
Since end rot develops from inconsistent watering, adding straw or grass clippings as mulch around the plants will help hold moisture and create a more stable environment. Fertilizing with calcium also helps.

Avoid insect damage with proactive planting
Companion plants such as nasturtium, basil and onions strategically placed in the garden will attract and trap insects such as aphids that you don't want on tomatoes or other veggies. Nasturtium is even more effective than marigolds as a pest deterrent, and maybe, even prettier. And did we mention they are also edible?

Water consistently
Since most fungus and bacteria problems are the result of too much or inconsistent watering, follow these watering tips for best results:
Water early in the morning; avoid watering in the hot part of the day.
Use drip irrigation or soak the soil with a hose when watering as over spraying with a sprinkler can promote bacteria growth.

Rotate plants
Make a note of where you planted your veggies this year and rotate them to another location next year. Rotating crops each year so that the same plants aren't grown repeatedly in one spot, helps deter fungus and bacteria growth.



Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Monday, July 12, 2010

When it's hot there are weeds

When we get to July and the temperatures are hot, the summer crop of weeds shows up en mass in flower beds and shrub beds in particular.
Anytime you're dealing with weeds, the best defense is the proverbial offense. Being proactive right from the start gets weeds under control and keeps your landscape looking neat and trim.

What IS a weed?
We think of the common weeds like dandelions and thistle when we hear the W-word. But a weed can be any plant that is growing in the wrong place. An acorn that falls and starts to sprout an oak tree that will grow under the eaves of your house is really a weed. Any plant that is misplaced for aesthetic or practical reasons needs to be treated like the standard weed and removed.

Hot season weeds
Typical weeds in the hottest part of the growing season include spurge, purslane, mallow, bindweed and thistle. With the exception of bindweed and thistle, one of the best controls is simply using mechanical means to eradicate them-namely, pulling them out or hoeing, if the area permits.

But don't pull that thistle or bindweed!
If you've ever noticed that some weeds seem to proliferate after you pull them, you're right! This actually happens with certain weeds that have regenerative root systems. Literally, the more you pull them, the more weeds you'll get back.
When it comes to thistle and field bindweed, stop before you pull! Both of these weeds have amazingly long root systems. When you pull these weeds, most of the root system remains underground and will simply grow more weeds to replace the one you pulled.
The best control for these weeds is applying a treatment that will kill the above-ground plant and the root system so that they will be dealt with for good. If these weeds are in the lawn, be sure to select a product that will not harm the grass.
Some herbicides used to zap the designated weed may be harmful to other plants due to drift. Be very careful what you spray and when, as even a slight breeze can take the product where you don't want it.


Need help getting your weeds under control?
Call FLM at (970) 472-0690 or email us at foothillslanscape@comcast.net




Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC

Friday, July 2, 2010

Water your garden efficiently, one drip at a time


As gardeners, we are often torn between wanting to provide all the water our plants need to stay healthy, and knowing we also need to conserve water. Drip irrigation is the practical solution to that creative tension.

With drip systems, water is applied directly to the area of newly planted seeds or to a plant's root zone, so there is almost no water loss from wind or general evaporation.

Drip irrigation can be used to water veggies and herbs, annual flowers, perennials and shrub beds. Drip systems are also practical because they can provide automatic watering for hard-to-reach places. The small tubes can be routed to hanging baskets as well as containers on the porch or patio.

Many of us have automatic sprinklers that take care of the lawn when we're away, but still have to ask a neighbor to water the flower pots. With a drip system, all of your plants can be watered automatically--and the neighbor will be glad to know she's off the hook.

Since it requires very little water pressure, drip is usually an easy add-on to an existing sprinkler system. Three basic types of drip irrigation include:


  • Micro sprays which emit a mist of water. These sprays are very effective to keep the soil moist while seeds are germinating. They are also good for misting certain veggie crops like lettuce.
  • Laser tube is placed on top of the soil and emits water directly from the tube. It is effective around the base of plants like tomatoes. It can also be run to hanging baskets and patio containers.
  • Sub-surface irrigation, as the name suggests, is placed underneath the soil and emits water in the root zone of the plants.

Tip of the Week reprinted courtesy of Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) of which Foothills Landscape Maintenance, LLC is a member. ALCC is the only only professional organization for Colorado's landscape contracting industry statewide. Tip of the Week is copyrighted by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and may be forwarded or copied by its members provided proper credit is given to ALCC